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No. III. 



WORDS, PHRASES, 



AND 



SHORT DIALOGUES, 

IN THE LANGUAGE OF THE LENNI LENAFE, OR DELAWARE 
INDIANS. 



BY 



THE REV. JOHN HE CKE WELDER, 

OF BETHLEHEM. 













1 1 




WORDS, PHRASES, Sjc. 

OF THE LENNI LENAPE, OR DELAWARE INDIANS, 



N'mitzi, I eat. 
N'gauwi, I drink. 
JN'wachpaeheli, I awake. 
N'menne, I drink. 
N'papommissi, / walk. 
N'gagelicksi, I laugh. 
N'mamentschi, I rejoice. 
N'daschwil, I swim. 
.N'manunxi, J am angry. 
N'mikemosi, / work. 
N'dellachgusi, / climb. 
N'nanipauwi, J stand. 
N'lemattachpi, I sit. 
Nopo, nochpo, n'hoppo, I smoke. 
N'schivvelendam, I am sorry. 
N'gattopui, / am hungry. 
N'gattosomi, lam thirsty. 
N'palsi, I am sick. 
Nolamalsi, lam well. 
N'nipitine, I have the tooth-ache. 
N'wiline, I have a head- ache. 
N'wisrhasi, lam afraid. 
N'wiquihhalla, I am tired. 
N'tschittanesi, J am strong. 
N'schawussi, lam weak,feebk. 
K'tuppocu. lam wise. 
N'nanolhand, I am la%y. 
N'pomochksi, I creep. 




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INDIAN WORDS, PHRASES, &C, 



N'dellernuske, I am going away. 

N'gattungwan. / am sleepy. 

Otenink n'da, I am going to town. 

Geloltowak, they are quarrelling. 

K'daholel, Hove you. 

Kschingalel, I hate you. 

Ponihi, let me alone. 

Palli aal, go away. 

Gotschemunk, go out of the house* 

Ickalli aal, away with you. 

Kschamehella, run. 

Ne nipauvvi, stop there. 

Undach aal, come here. 

Kpahi, shut the door. 

Tauwunni, open the door, lid, &c. 

Pisellissu, soft. 

Pisalatulpe, soft-shelled tortoise. 

Xulupatschi, otherwise, on the other hand, else, however. 

„ , Vboth (of them.) 

Eivehwi, J > 

L**u, true. 

AUane lewi, it is not true. 

Alia gaski lewi, it cannot be true. 

Bischi, bischihk, yes, indeed, (it is so). 

N'wingallauwi, I like to hunt. 

N'vvinggi mikemosi, I like to work. 

JM'schingi mikemosi. I don't like to work. 

N'winginammen, I like it. 

N'wingandammen, I like the taste (of it.) 

NVingarhpinn, I like to be here. 

N'schingachpihn, I dislike being here. 

N'mechquihn, I have a cold, cough. 

Undach lenni, reach it hither. 

Undach lennemauwil, reach it to me. 

iN'gattopui, I am hungry. 

N'gattosomi, I am thirsty. 

N'wiquihilla, lam tired, fatigued. 



Vi- 



INDIAN WORDS, PHRASES, &C. 



455 



N'tschitannessi, lam strong. 
JNTschauwihilla, I am weak, faint 
N'wischasi, lam afraid, 

N'daptessi, / sweat. 

NMagotschi, lam cold, freezing, 

NMellennowi, I am a man. 

N'dochquewi, I am a woman, 

M'damandommen, I feel. 

N'leheleche, Hive, exist, draw breath, 

Lecheen, to exist, breathe, draw breath, be alive. 

Lee he won, breath. 

Note. As we would ask a person whom we had not 
seen for a long time : « Are you alive yet ?" — or, is 
such and such a one yet alive? the Indian would 
say: 

Hi kleheleche ! do you draw breath yet ? 

Leheleche ili nitis, N. N. ? does my favourite friend^. N. 
yet draw breath ? 

Gooch ili lehelecheu ? does your father draw breath yet? 

Gahawees ili lehelecheu? does your mother draw breath 
yet? 

.N'tschu ! my friend! 

N'tsclmtti, dear, beloved friend. 

Nitis, confidential friend. 

Geptschat, a fool. 

Geptschatschik, fools. 

Leppoat, wise. 

Leppoeu, he is wise. 

Leppoatschik, wise men, wise people. 

Sokelaan, it rains. 

K'schilaan, it rains hard. 

Pelelaan, it begins to rain. 

Achwi sokelaan, it rains very hard. 

Alia sokelaan, it has left off raining. 

Peelliacquon, it thunders. 

Sasapelehelleu, it lightens. 

Petaquiechen, the streams are using, 







456 



INDIAN WORDS, PHRASES, &C* 



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M'chaquiechen, the streams are up, high. 
Choppecat, the water is deep. 
Meetschi higihelleu, the waters are falling. 
Sichilleu meetschi, the waters have run off. 
Tatehuppecat, shallow water. 
Gahan, very low water, next to being dried up. 
K'schnppehelleu, a strong current, riffle. 
Pulpecat, deep dead water, as in a cove or bay. 
Clampeching, a dead running stream, the current imper- 
ceptible. 
Kschachan, the wind. 
Ta undchen I from whence blows the wind ? 
Lowanneunk undchen, the wind comes from the north. 
Schawanneunk undchen, the wind comes from the south. 
Schawanaehen, south wind. 
Lowannaehen, north wind. 
Wundchenneunk, in the west. 
Gachpatteyeunk, in the east. 
Moschhaequot, a clear sky. 
Kschiechpecat, clear water, clear pure water. 
Achgumhocquat, cloudy. 
Packenum, dark, (very). 
Pekenink, in the dark. 
Pisgeu, it is dark. 

Pisgeke, when it becomes dark, (is dark). 
Mali ! there, take it! 
Yuni, this. 
Nanni, nan, that. 
Wullih, yonder. 
Wachelemi, afar off. 

Wachelemat ? is it afar off, a great way off? 
Pechuat, near, nigh. 
Pechuwiwi, near, (not far off.) 
Pechutschi, near. 
Pechu lennitti, directly, presently. 
Pechu, soon, directly. 
Alige, if so, nevertheless. 




INDIAN WORDS, PHRASES, &C. 



457 



Alige n'dallennisca, I will go for all, nevertheless I will 
go. 

Yu undarhqui ! this way, to this side ! 

Icka iindachqui, to ijon side. 

Ickalli undarhqui ! still further on that way ! 

Wullih ! yonder! 

Wullih tab ! beyond that! 

Pernio wullih ! look yonder ! 

Nachgiechen, it has hit against something, (cannot move 
or be driven forward), as a joke, a pin in a building. 

Clagachen, it rests on something in the water, is grounded. 

Clagachen amochol, the canoe is aground, rests on some- 
thing. 

Clagachen aschwitchan, the raft has grounded. 

Tauwihilla, sunk, it has sunk. 

N'damchol k'tauwihille, my canoe sunk. 

Gachpattol amochol, take the canoe out of the water. 

Gachpallatam, let us get out and go on shore. 

Pusik ! embark! (ye). 

Pusil ! embark ! (thou). 

Wischiksil ! be thou vigilant, quick, in earnest and exert 
thyself! 

Wischiksik ! be ye vigilant, in earnest, quick! (about it). 
Note. The word wischiksi or wischixi is by the white 
people interpreted as signifying « be strong," which 
does not convey the true meaning of this word, it 
comprehends more ; it asks for exertions to be made a 
to fulfil the object. 

N'petalogalgun ! J am sent as a messenger ! 

N'sagimaum petalogalgun yu petschi, my chief has sent 
me as a messenger to you. 

Matta nutschquem'pawi, lam not come for nothing, (mean- 
ing, being on an errand). 

Pechu k'pendammenewo wentsche payan, you will soon 
hear why I am come here. 

Tschingetsch kmatschi? when do you return home again? 




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INDIAN WORDS, PHRASES, &C. 



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Sedpook ! at day break I 

N'dellgun lachpi gatta paame, / was told to hasten, and 
return quickly. 

Lachpi, quick* (without delay). 

N'mauwi pihm, lam going to take a sweat (at the sweat 
house). 

N'dapi pihm, lam come from sweating (from the sweat 
house). 

N'dapellauwi, J am come from hunting. 

N'dapi notarosesi, I come from taking fish with the spear. 

N'dapi aman, I come from fishing with the hook and line. 

N'dapi achquaneman, I come from bush-net fishing. 

Notameshican, a fishing spear, gig. 

Aman, a fish hook. 

Achquaneman, a bush net. 

Apatschiane, when I return. 

Gopharamen, | fo ghut m ^^ fl door> &{ , 

K'pahammen, J 

Kpahi, shut the door. 

Kpaskhamen, to plug up tight. 

Tauwun. open the door. 

Tauwiinni, open the door for me. 

M'biak, a whale, (fish). 

Yuh' allauwitan ! come, let us go a hunting.' 

Nelema n'metenaxiwi, I am not yet ready. 

K'metenaxi yiirke ? are you now ready. 

Nelema ta ! not yet ! 

Pechu lenitti, by and by. 

Lahappa pehil ! wait a little for me ! 

Nelema n'gischambila niwash ! I have not yet done tieing 
up my pack.' 

Yuh? yehucke allemusketam ! well now let us go on ! 

Schuck sokelaan gachtauwi ! but it will rain I 

Quanna ta ! even if it does, no matter if it does! 

Alia kschilange, when the shower is over. 

Ta hatsch gemauwikeneen ? at rvhat place shall we en- 
camp ? 



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INDIAN WORDS, PHRASES, & C . 459 

Wdiungoakhannink, at the white oak run. 

Enda gochgochgachen, at the crossing, fording-place 

Enda tachtschaiinge, at the narrows, (where the hill comes 
close on the river). 

Meechek achsinink, at the big rock. 

Gauwahenink, at the place of the fallen timbers. 

Sikheunk, at the salt spring. 

Pachsevink, in the valley. 

Wachtschunk, on the hill, 

Yapevvi, on the river bank. 

Gamink, on the other side of the river. 

Eli shingeek, on the flat, (level upland), 

Mahonink, at the lick, (deer lick). 

Otenink, in the town. 

Tekenink, in the woods. 

Hachkihacanink, in the field. 

Pockhapockink, at the creek between the two hills. 

Menatheink, on the island. 

Enda Iechauhanne, at the forks of the river. 

Enda lechauwiechen, at the forks of the road. 

Sakunk, at the outlet of the river, (mouth of the river). 

1 huppeciink, at the cold spring. 

K'mesha ? did you kill a deer? 

Atta, n'paileha I no, I missed him ! 

Yuh' allacqui ! what a pity / 

Biesch fcjotewa ? then you did see one ? 

Nachen n'newa achluch, three times I saw deer 

Quonna eet kpungum machtit, perhaps your powder is 

bad. I 

-Na leu, that is true, so it turned out to be. 
Achtschingi pockteu, it scarcely took f re. 
Achtuchuike vvernan? are there plenty of deer where v 0U 

was? J 

Atta ta hiisca, not a great many. 
Nangutti schuck n'peenhalle, 1 sp,w but few tracks. 
Machk kpenhalle ? did you track any bears? 

VeL. I. 3 N 



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460 



INDIAN" WORDS, PHRASES, &C. 



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Biesch n'penhalle mauchsu, I tracked but one. 

Srhuck n'dallemons mekane, but my dog. 

Palli uchschiha, drove him off. 

N'gatta amocholhe, I want to make a canoe, 

Witsrhemil ! help me / 

N'pachkhamen gachtauwi, I want to get bled. 

Yuh, nanne leketsch, well do so, let it be so. 

N'matamalai, I feel unwell. 

Woak n'nipitine, and have the tooth-ache. 

Witschemil ! help me 1 

Ponihil, let me alone. 

Tschitgussil ! be still, hold your tongue ! 

Kschahel ! strike hard, lay on well J (on wood, &C.) 

Mileen, to give, the giving. 

Mil. give. 

Mili. give me. 

Milineen, give us. 

Miltin, given, (was already). 

Miltoagan, a present. 

N'milgun, it xv as given to me. 

Milo, give him. 

MUatamo, let us give him. 

Sehe ! hush, be quiet / 

Eke ! dear, wonderful i 

Ekesa ! miserable, for shame! 

Suppinquall, tears. 

Lepacku, he cries. 

E golian, yes, indeed. 

Kehella, aye, yes. 

Kehella ? so, is it possible ? 

Kehella la ! yes, so it is ! 

Yuli kehella ! well, then ! 

La kella ! to be sure, His so I 

Kehella kella! yes yes ! 

E-E, yes, (a lazy yes). 

Mattaj m* 



INDIAN WORDS, PHRASES, &C. 



461 



Ta, no, (a lazy wo). 

Tagii, no, not. 

Atta ta, no, no. 

Eekhockewitschik mamachtagewak, the nations are war- 
ring against each other, 

Yuh allacqui na lissichtit, indeed it is a pity they do so. 

Napenaltowaktsche, they will be scalping each oilier. 

Auween won gintsch pat ? who is that who just now 
came ? 

Taktaani, I don't know. 

Mauwi pernio, go and see. 

Auween khackey ? who are you ? (of what nation). 

Lennape n'hackey, J am an Indian, (of the Lenni Le~ 
nape). 

Ta koom ? where do you come from ? 

Otenink noom, I come from the town. 

Auween kpetschi witscheuchgun ? who came with yon 
here ? 

Na nipauwit, he who stands there. 

Lennape ? is he an Indian ? (a Lenni Lenape). 

Tah, Mengwe, no, he is a Mingo, an Iroquois. 

Kpetschi witscheuchgun otenink untschi? did he come with 
you from the town ? 

Matta ! n'mattelukgun, no I he fell in with me (by the 
way). 

Ta talli ? where ? 

Wulli tah achtschaunge ! yonder at the narrows 1 

Ki gieschquike ? this day? (to day). 

Atta ! vvelaquike, no 1 last evening. 

Kcecu undochwe wentsdii yu paat ? what is he come here 
for, what is he after f 

Taktani, schuck n'tschupinawe ! I don't know, but I mis- 
trust him ! 

Tsciipinaxu gahenna, he appears suspicious, has a suspi- 
cious appearance. 

Gichgeraotket quonna, probably h^is a thief 





463 



INDfAN WORDS, PHRASES, &C, 



/ J 



Wewitschi eet, most likely, (he is such). 
N'gemotemiike n'dallemons nechnaunges, my horse haa 

been stolenfrom me. 
Wichwinggi gemotgewafc Mengwe, the Mingoes are very 

fond of stealing. 
Tub amachgidicu, they are vagabonds. 
Gachtingetsch, next year. 
Lehelechejane, if Ilive t (or am alive). 
Gamhackinktsch n'da, I will go across the sea, (or more 

properly) to the country beyond the sea. 
Clamachpil ! sit still/ 

Schiki a na Lenno, that is a fine pretty man. 
Quatsch luppackhan ? why do you cry ? 
N'nilchgun na nipauwit, he that stands there struck me. 
Uchschimo meetschi, he has already ran off, made away 

with himself. 
T'cliunno ! catch him! 
Gachbilau ! tie him! 
Lachenau ! let him loose! 
Weemi, or wemi auween lue, every body says. 
Wigwingi geloltoak schwannakwak, that the white people 

are fond of quarreling. 
N'matuoguatn, I had a bad dream. 
N'matschi, I will go home. 
Siquonne iappitsrh knewi lehellecheyan ! in the spring you 

will see me again if I am alive. 
Yuh, schuck matnschali ! well, but do remember me ! 
Natsch leu, it shall be so, that shall be done. 
N'nuntsr.bimke, / have been called. 
Auween guntscliimgun ? who called yon? 
NMochqueum, my wife. 
N'nitsch undach aal ! come hither my child! 
Lachpi ! quick ! 

Wayu nipauwi (or nipavvi), there stand. 
P^llah, indeed, surely, so so. 

Petalamo auween, somebody sounds (calls out) the alarm 
yell, (signifying danger at hand). 



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INDIAN WORDS, PHRASES, &C. 



465 



Yuh, sliimoitam ! come, let us run off. 

Nelema ta ? not yet ! 

Quanna eet auween gatta napenalgun ! perhaps somebody 
is coming to attack and scalp us ! 

Wewitschi eet, probably, may-be. 

Pennau ! look I 

Wulli ta pepannik ! yonder they are coming ! 

Auween knewa ? who do you see? 

Machelook, or chelook schwannakwak, many white peo- 
ple. 

Papomiscuak ? are they on foot ? 

Alende, some of them. 

Schuk matta weemi, but not all of them. 

Gachtonalukguntsch matta uchschimuienge, we shall be 
attacked if we do not make off with ourselves. 

Yuh, uchschimuitam alige, well, then, let us make off at 
any rate. 

Mattapewivvak nik schwannakwak, the white people are a 
rascally set of beings. 

Kilunewak wingi, they are given to lieing. 

Kschinggalguna gehenna, they hate us truly. 

Gemotemukguna wingi, they like, are disposed to rob us, 
are thieves upon us. 

Yuh, gachtonalatam ! well, let us fall upon them, attack 
them. 

Longundowinaquot, it looks likely for peace, there is a pros- 
pect of peace. 
Pennau won ! look at that one i 
Achgieuchsu, he is drunk. 
Achgepingwe, he is blind. 
Achgepcheu, he is deaf 
.Kpitscheu, he is foolish. 
Sopsu, he is naked. 
Mamaminxu, he is angry. 
Schaaksu, he is covetous. 
Pihmtonheu, he has a crooked mouth. 



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INDIAN WORDS, PHBASE8, &C. 



Ilau, he is a great war-captain. 
Sakimau, he is a chief. 
Kschamehellatam, let us run together. 
Tipaas, a hen. Tipatit, a chicken. 
Tscholens, a bird. Tscholentit, a little bird* 



END OF VOLUME FIRST, 



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ERRATA IN No. II. 



Page 356, 
564, 
367, 

382, 
395, 

402, 

307, 
412, 

415, 
416, 

422, 



42S, 

439, 
445, 



441, 



Lr> T E 11 — For " Zeisberger" read " Heckewelder '." 
3 — (of letter iv.) For "from* read "for." 
24 — For " schwanaki" read M schwanameki." 
25 — For " chwani" read " chwami." 
18 — For " kflehe/lei/a" read " k'lehelleclwya," 
16 — For " wulatopnachgat" read " wtdaptonachgat." 
18 — For " Tvitlatonaniiii* read " widatenamin." 
8 — (of letter xvii.) For " -word" read '•' words." 
9 — (of the same) For t( manner" read " matter." 
25 — For " achpansi" read " achpanschi." 
6 — (from the bottom) For " Indian corn" read " apar- 
ticidar species of Indian corn." 
32 — For " ktahoateW' read " ktahoalell." 
7 — For " gnnich" read " gunih." 

4 — (from the bottom) For " eliwidek" read " eluwilek." 
3 — (from the bottom) For w allowilen" read " allowilek ." 
For the English translation of these two words, substitute 

"Me twos* extraordinary, the most wonderful." 
1 — (from the bottom) For " eluwantowit" read " eluwan- 

nittowit." 
2 — For " elewassit" read " elewussit." 
4 — For " Me supremely good" read " Me mos* Ao/z/ <me." 
6 and 7 — For " schingieschin" read schingiechm." 
4 — For " mamscha!gnssiwagan ,> Te&d iS ?namschalgusso- 

wagan." 
5 — For " mamintoschimgussowagan" read mamintschim- 

gussowagan* 
3— For " m'c/wnschicanes" read " m'chonschican." 




ADDITIONAL ERRATUM IN NO. I. 

Page 322, Lixe 9— For " Indians* read " traders. " 



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PROM THE COLUMBIAN CGNTfNEL. 

AMERICAN SKETCHES. 
It is said, that the celebrated chief Metacora, 
otherwise called Kiug Philip, related to his 
counsellors and friends a dream, in which 
he had striking indications or' his approach- 
ing ruin. He had scarcely finished his re- 
lation, when he was discovered by his ene- 
mies* and killed on the spot, near Bristol 
(K. I.) 

FHILIP'S DREAM, 

^He dreamt of a Coffin, he dreamt of a shroud* 
And the death-cry of vengeance rung dismal 

and leud ; 
He dreamt of the vale where the dead are at 

rest, 
And reroil'd from the vulture that preyed on 

his breast. 

Now ye kinsmen and clansmen, why look with 

dismay ? 
Can the mighty King Philip sq soon pass away ? 
j No, no, cries the chief, 'twas the breath of a 

shade, 
( Now (ill ye your quivers, and bare ye each 
blade. 

» Oh • their spears and their arrows but little 
• avail, 
Hark, hark to the war-shout, the weeping, aHd 
' Wail; J 

Death fl*soed like the lightnipg, his dream is 
reveaPd, 
j A;id the eye of that monarch in darkness is 
seal'd. 

j Now his kinsmen and clansmen are howling 
f ' afar, v 

| The chief that they followed has fallen in war. 
i They looked, and the vulture that aadden'd 

his dream, 
Has struck his black pinion, and uttered his 

scream. 

The mighty King Philip—and can it be thou ? 
Why sound not thy war-cry, why cloud not thy 

brow ? 
The woif bowls around him, it breaks not his 

rest, 
And he scares not the vulture away from his 

breast. A. K. 

QT This incident is mentioned by most oi 
our old historians. 



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